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Moon Installation #No 2

Moon Installation #no2 comprising indigo batik on cotton panels and Yukata Kimono.
Lilly Wong & Tom Scrimgeour in collaboration with Square Roots.
January 5-6th 2022

We explore the dramatic phases of the moon as it rises into its full shape. As the moons ascend, the darker the indigo panels become sending the moon deeper into the nights sky. The epic industrial environment lends space to the installation, adding to the magnitude and scale of the project and the coming of an optimistic new lunar year.

The steel and pipework feels its way across the factory floor, floating kimono positioned like soldiers, occupy the free space while complimenting the moon phases. These wearable art pieces hang like supernatural beings, phantoms brought alive by the light breeze.

Background

Justin Wheatcroft of Square Roots, approached us at the right time. With his new furniture factory nearing completion, there would be a sweet spot of a few days where we would have autonomy of the expansive space to make something before the factory would be put into operation. Our minds rattled with ideas, and the possibility of producing something on such a colossal scale overshadowed the logistics of how to accomplish such a task. We quickly had a working theme and plan to set us on our way. The installation would be an extension of Lilly’s original Moon Installation #no1 on a much larger scale, and with lunar new year around the corner, the timing was perfect. Justin is Co-Founder & Managing Director at Square Roots – designers and craftsman of contemporary furniture.

In the banner design process, the lunar phases are split into 9 panels, with the new moon forming the centre piece. The moons grow outwards as the indigo panels darken until reaching the two outer bright full moons. The darkest shade of fabric was achieved by over thirty dips into the indigo dye vat.

The Kimono installation mirrors the full moons and creates a wearable part of the collection and a core ethos of our company – wearable art.

From start to finish, this was a labour of love – the hands on approach that drives us. Practical work is play and a vital component of our creativity. The installing of the artwork was lots of fun, helped along by the skilled members of staff at Square Roots.

  • moon phases
  • moon phases

Outcome

The moon’s phases are mathematically aligned as they rise up the banners, giving rhythm to the natural phenomena of our satellite’s orbit around us.

Executing the entire process involved sourcing fabric, planning, designing, painting, indigo dyeing, sewing and assembling the installation. The result is something beautiful made for others to enjoy, handcrafted and validated by the appreciation and personal engagement of others. This purpose has arrived perfectly for Lunar New Year, a connection we all have and an art piece we can all understand and admire; the purpose is to celebrate with everyone.

Completing the process gives us fulfilment, reward and accomplishment. This consolidates what we set out to achieve. Art that connects and resonates with everyone, and its ability to be worn; wearable art.

lilly wong tom scrimgeour moon phases
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Art and Noren

Indigo Noren & Moon Art Pieces are on display at Soma Saigon

Soma in Thao Dien Ward, Ho Chi Minh City is now host to original art pieces created by lillywong.art for Oi. Read ahead to learn more about the artist, work, process, how you can commission your own pieces, and enjoy listening to our moon inspired playlist whilst you read.

Thank you.

About our Noren and Art

Noren 暖簾 are traditional Japanese fabric dividers hung between rooms, on walls, in doorways or in windows. 

The natural Linen has been batik resist dyed to create the circular moons. The deep blue has been submerged in the indigo vat over twenty times to achieve its colour. Varying shades of blue extend out of the white centre revealing the gradation in the dye process. 

The batik process uses beeswax to form a resist on an area of the fabric where the indigo dye cannot permeate. The rest of the fabric takes to the indigo leaving the waxed area white when removed. The work requires much time, patience and love to complete.

The moons came about after long nights of dyeing, with the full moon providing our light and inspiration.

Tom Scrimgeour and Lilly Wong, the Founders of KIIRO.

Lillywong.art and Kiiro

Joint founder Lilly is a practising artist, showcasing her art pieces through Kiiro. The large moons can also be found on a smaller scale in our homeware collection. Lilly is currently offering her photography resources on her website to raise money for the orphans of the Covid 19 pandemic here in Vietnam. Click LillyWong.art to find out more.

Commission your own

Leave us your contact details in the form below if you are interested in owning your own unique piece and Lilly will get in touch.

Indigo Napkins and Runners

In our shop, we have a collection of napkins and table runners available using the same techniques shown in the art pieces. They make a beautiful addition to any table set.

More thoughts on Indigo